See also:
» 03.03.2010 - UNAIDS partner with rock icon to fight AIDS
» 12.01.2010 - UN partners seek to eliminate HIV in children
» 24.11.2009 - Global HIV infections down by 17 percent
» 23.09.2009 - Report calls for HIV-sensitive laws and policing to combat AIDS
» 10.09.2009 - Circumcision cost-effective means to prevent HIV - UN report
» 19.05.2009 - Global health advocates call for African voices against Obama's budget cut
» 13.03.2009 - New partnership to increase funding for Africa's finght against AIDS
» 04.12.2008 - UK sets tough new targets for UN Africa programmes











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World
Health | Science - Education

Bananas against AIDS?

afrol News, 15 March - Scientists have found a special protein in the banana that could help women prevent being infected by HIV during sexual intercourse. They hope this may open the door to new and cheaper treatments to prevent the spread of AIDS.

The researchers, from the US University of Michigan Medical School, have an emerging interest in lectins, a type of proteins naturally occurring chemicals in plants, because of their ability to halt the chain of reaction that leads to a variety of infections.

"In laboratory tests, BanLec, the lectin found in bananas, was as potent as two current anti-HIV drugs," according to the study. Based on the findings published this month in the scientific 'Journal of Biological Chemistry,' "BanLec may become a less expensive new component of applied vaginal microbicides," researchers say.

Although condom use is quite effective, condoms are most successful in preventing infection if used consistently and correctly, which is often not the case.

"That is particularly true in developing countries where women have little control over sexual encounters so development of a long-lasting, self-applied microbicide is very attractive," says study senior author David Marvovitz.

Some of the most promising compounds for inhibiting vaginal and rectal HIV transmission are agents that block HIV prior to integration into its target cell, according to the study.

The new research describes the complex actions of lectins and their ability to outsmart HIV. Lectins are sugar-binding proteins. They can identify foreign invaders, like a virus, and attach themselves to the pathogen.

The researcher team discovered BanLec, the lectin in bananas, can inhibit HIV infection by binding to the sugar-rich HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120, and blocking its entry to the body.

"Therapies using BanLec could be cheaper to create than current anti-retroviral medications which use synthetically produced components, plus BanLec may provide a wider range of protection," the US researchers say.

"The problem with some HIV drugs is that the virus can mutate and become resistant, but that is much harder to do in the presence of lectins," says lead author Michael Swanson.


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